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Thursday, February 11, 2016

Slavery: An Important and Informative Interview

From CBC's Ideas:

Thursday February 11, 2016

Blood and Earth - Kevin Bales

  • The larger cement home is owned by a private school teacher in Nouchott, Mauritania. He is a slave owner, his slaves - which he calls his guardian family - live in the shack out front.

      • The larger cement home is owned by a private school teacher in Nouchott, Mauritania. He is a slave owner, his slaves - which he calls his guardian family - live in the shack out front. (David Gutnick/CBC)
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      Listen to Full Episode 53:59
      What do the shrimp on your plate, the cell phone in your pocket and the rising pollution levels in the developing world have in common? Kevin Bales says, in a word: slavery. Paul Kennedy talks with the author of Blood and Earth: Modern Slavery, Ecocide and the Secret to Saving the World.

      HIGHLIGHT CLIP:

      Kevin Bales argues that slavery is not only morally unacceptable and bad business, he also says there is proof that slavery is a major contributer to climate change
       


      Blood and Earth by Kevin Bales
      Kevin Bales has spent decades travelling the world meeting with slaves and slaveholders. He is the co-founder of Free the Slaves, the largest abolitionist organization in the world, and lead author of the Global Slavery Index  which estimates the number of slaves in 167 countries. It seems almost impossible that today more than 35 million people are slaves. Kevin Bales says that those of us living in comfortable, consumer-driven societies must shoulder some of the blame. We want our electronic toys, clothes and food to be plentiful and cheap. These material wants enslave people and help maintain business models that rely on cheap, and even free, labour.

      Blood and Earth: Modern Slavery, Ecocide, And The Secret To Saving The World is published by Random House.

      About the image gallery:
      In 2008 CBC national reporter David Gutnick spent time in Mauritania, Togo, and Ghana putting together stories on slavery. In Mauritania it turned out that his interpreter was a slave owner. In a small village in Togo, David met with former child slaves who had escaped and formed a club to educate parents about child trafficking; and in Ghana David followed anti-slave activist Jack Dawson as he went from village to village along the shores of Lake Volta looking for children as young as four and five years old who were forced to fish. David is now a producer with IDEAS.

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